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U.S. TAX FILINGS

Don't worry about taxes, we'll do it for you!

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MAXIMUM WEALTH PRESERVATION

Preserve Your Hard-Earned Wealth!

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INTERNATIONAL TAX STRATEGY

U.S. Expat Tax Filings

Welcome to maxWEALTH Finance, Accounting & Tax Consultants - We Maximize Your Wealth!

maxWEALTH is committed to providing wealth, tax & accounting services for a wide range of clients including Individuals, Business Owners, H1B/L1 or Consultants working on Client Projects, Physicians, High Net Worth Individuals, Students working on OPT/CPT. Call or email us. Our professionals are ready to answer any question you may have. If you do not know who to revert to, please contact us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . We will endeavor to respond to your enquiry within 1 business days of receipt.

WE WANT TO SERVE YOU!

 

maxWEALTH provides Tax & Wealth Advisory Services for a number of people including:

  • Individuals

  • Business Owners

  • US Expatriates Working Abroad

  • Doctors/Physicians

  • H1B/L1 Consultants working on Client Projects

  • Students working on OPT/CPT

We provide extreme data  security for all our client's tax returns and will ensure 100% customer satisfaction at an affordable price.

maxWEALTH CONSULTING SERVICES

 

maxWEALTH provides a comprehensive range of services tailored to your financial needs:

  • Personal & Business Taxes

  • Year Round Full Service

  • Prior Year Filings & Amendments

  • Super Fast Rapid Refunds

  • Direct  Deposits

  • Accounting Services 

  • IRS Audit Help

maxWEALTH can serve all your wealth planning needs.

Tax Information for Students Who Take a Summer Job

May 20, 2014 : Many students take a job in the summer after school lets out. If it’s your first job it gives you a chance to learn about the working world. That includes taxes we pay to support the place where we live, our state and our nation. Here are eight things that students who take a summer job should know about taxes:

1. Don’t be surprised when your employer withholds taxes from your paychecks. That’s how you pay your taxes when you’re an employee. If you’re self-employed, you may have to pay estimated taxes directly to the IRS on certain dates during the year. This is how our pay-as-you-go tax system works.

2. As a new employee, you’ll need to fill out a Form W-4, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate. Your employer will use it to figure how much federal income tax to withhold from your pay. The IRS Withholding Calculator tool on IRS.gov can help you fill out the form.

3. Keep in mind that all tip income is taxable. If you get tips, you must keep a daily log so you can report them. You must report $20 or more in cash tips in any one month to your employer. And you must report all of your yearly tips on your tax return.

4. Money you earn doing work for others is taxable. Some work you do may count as self-employment. This can include jobs like baby-sitting and lawn mowing. Keep good records of expenses related to your work. You may be able to deduct (subtract) those costs from your income on your tax return. A deduction may help lower your taxes.

5. If you’re in ROTC, your active duty pay, such as pay you get for summer camp, is taxable. A subsistence allowance you get while in advanced training isn’t taxable.

6. You may not earn enough from your summer job to owe income tax. But your employer usually must withhold Social Security and Medicare taxes from your pay. If you’re self-employed, you may have to pay them yourself. They count toward your coverage under the Social Security system.

7. If you’re a newspaper carrier or distributor, special rules apply. If you meet certain conditions, you’re considered self-employed. If you don’t meet those conditions and are under age 18, you are usually exempt from Social Security and Medicare taxes.

8. You may not earn enough money from your summer job to be required to file a tax return. Even if that’s true, you may still want to file. For example, if your employer withheld income tax from your pay, you’ll have to file a return to get your taxes refunded

Things to Know about IRS Notices and Letters

April 22, 2014 : Each year, the IRS sends millions of notices and letters to taxpayers for a variety of reasons. Here are ten things to know in case one shows up in your mailbox.

1. Don’t panic. You often only need to respond to take care of a notice.

2. There are many reasons why the IRS may send a letter or notice. It typically is about a specific issue on your federal tax return or tax account. A notice may tell you about changes to your account or ask you for more information. It could also tell you that you must make a payment.

3. Each notice has specific instructions about what you need to do.

4. You may get a notice that states the IRS has made a change or correction to your tax return. If you do, review the information and compare it with your original return.

5. If you agree with the notice, you usually don’t need to reply unless it gives you other instructions or you need to make a payment.

6. If you do not agree with the notice, it’s important for you to respond. You should write a letter to explain why you disagree. Include any information and documents you want the IRS to consider. Mail your reply with the bottom tear-off portion of the notice. Send it to the address shown in the upper left-hand corner of the notice. Allow at least 30 days for a response.

7. You shouldn’t have to call or visit an IRS office for most notices. If you do have questions, call the phone number in the upper right-hand corner of the notice. Have a copy of your tax return and the notice with you when you call. This will help the IRS answer your questions.

8. Keep copies of any notices you receive with your other tax records.

9. The IRS sends letters and notices by mail. We do not contact people by email or social media to ask for personal or financial information.

10. For more on this topic contact us.